Workshop Descriptions

(In-person) Climate Change Impacts on PNW Trees Symposium

Climate change introduces a new challenge for municipalities as it has the potential to affect areas of forest cover in ways we may not yet completely understand. The recent lack of cold winters, attributed to climate change, has allowed for the Mountain Pine beetle to wipe out enormous areas of forest land in Canada and the United States. Prolonged drought in California lead to thousands of acres of dead and dying trees in urban and rural areas. Dead and dying trees lead to increased chance of forest fires.

Those who will benefit from attending this symposium include arborists in the municipal and private sectors, other professionals who work with trees and forests, as well as anyone interested in how climate change is impacting trees. Presenters will propose best practices for future tree selection, maintenance and management in light of climate changes.

The goal for the symposium is to layout a foundation of ideas and experiences, and use those to develop long term action plans to combat the affects of climate change. Along the way we hope to see if we can sort out fact from fiction. By the end of the day we will have a starting point for further debate, some sense of the science available, and initial paths to work on. Our hope is that we can use this material to start focussing on what we have, what we might lose, and how we can work in urban areas to increase the resiliency of our urban forests to enhance their chances of long-term survival.

(Live Interactive Webinar) Climate Change Impacts on PNW Trees Symposium

Climate change introduces a new challenge for municipalities as it has the potential to affect areas of forest cover in ways we may not yet completely understand. The recent lack of cold winters, attributed to climate change, has allowed for the Mountain Pine beetle to wipe out enormous areas of forest land in Canada and the United States. Prolonged drought in California lead to thousands of acres of dead and dying trees in urban and rural areas. Dead and dying trees lead to increased chance of forest fires.

Those who will benefit from attending this symposium include arborists in the municipal and private sectors, other professionals who work with trees and forests, as well as anyone interested in how climate change is impacting trees. Presenters will propose best practices for future tree selection, maintenance and management in light of climate changes.

The goal for the symposium is to layout a foundation of ideas and experiences, and use those to develop long term action plans to combat the affects of climate change. Along the way we hope to see if we can sort out fact from fiction. By the end of the day we will have a starting point for further debate, some sense of the science available, and initial paths to work on. Our hope is that we can use this material to start focussing on what we have, what we might lose, and how we can work in urban areas to increase the resiliency of our urban forests to enhance their chances of long-term survival.

Advanced Tree Identification

This course is designed as a supplement and complement to the Basic Tree Identification course. Where the basic course covered concepts and terminology of tree identification, this advanced identification workshop will expand upon those concepts and techniques, and cover individual species common to our area. We will be going over identification characteristics of common trees in the region.

Proper tree management starts with knowing the tree you’re managing. When trying to recommend an appropriate treatment, diagnosing an issues, or understanding how a tree will respond to a change in condition, identifying the tree you’re dealing with is the first step.

The workshop will be inside for the first third or less, and will go outside to cover individual species. However, to make the course as useful as possible, attendees should choose a few species or genre that they want to examine. The workshop will be hands on, and questions and interaction is encouraged.

Please bring proper attire for standing and taking notes in inclement weather.

Basic Tree Identification

Proper tree management starts with knowing the tree you’re managing. When trying to recommend an appropriate treatment, diagnosing an issue, or understanding how a tree will respond to a change in conditions, identifying the tree you’re dealing with is the first step.

This basic identification workshop serves as an introduction to common terms, concepts, and techniques in tree identification. The objective of the course is to get you familiar with how to identify a tree, covering leaves, fruit, bark, twigs, and form.

As there are well more species that can grow in our region than can be covered in a single basic workshop, focus will be on larger concepts that will lay the ground work for future identification. We will cover the use of dichotomous keys and get familiar with descriptive terminology to help narrow down unknown species.

The workshop will be inside for the first half and will go outside for the second half to get familiar with using the concepts and terminology in the real world. The workshop will be hands on, and questions and interaction is encouraged. Please bring proper attire for standing and taking notes in inclement weather.

ISA Certified Arborist, Utility Specialist, and Municipal Specialist Exam

Enrollment Deadline: March 25, 2020

Location: Spokane, Washington, UNITED STATES
Organizer: Pacific Northwest
Contact Name: ISA Certification Department
Contact Phone:: 217-355-9411
Contact Email: isa@isa-arbor.com
Seats Available: 50
Cert Exam Chapter: Pacific Northwest

ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification

The ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification (TRAQ) program provides an opportunity for professionals in the arboriculture industry to expand their knowledge through education and training in the fundamentals of tree risk assessment. This qualification promotes the safety of people and property by providing a standardized and systematic process for assessing tree risk. The results of a tree risk assessment can provide tree owners and risk managers with the information to make informed decisions to enhance tree benefits, health, and longevity.

ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification Renewal

The ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification (TRAQ) program provides an opportunity for professionals in the arboriculture industry to expand their knowledge through education and training in the fundamentals of tree risk assessment. This qualification promotes the safety of people and property by providing a standardized and systematic process for assessing tree risk. The results of a tree risk assessment can provide tree owners and risk managers with the information to make informed decisions to enhance tree benefits, health, and longevity. The Tree Risk Assessment Renewal workshop is a one-day refresher, with five hours of instruction, and three hours of take the exam. Current TRAQ holders can complete the abbreviated course as early as four years into their qualification.

Pruning, Planting and Selecting for Street Tree Diversity

The importance of maintaining urban tree canopy is becoming ever more compelling. Campaigns to plant millions of trees are sprouting up throughout the region. The stakes are high to ensure that newly planted trees have the right start for future sustainability and function.

Errors in plant selection and planting practices, and a lack of early structural training can thwart future tree vitality and longevity. This workshop will provide essential currant information on practices that can make all the difference between a well-functioning future urban canopy and one with greater demands for maintenance and replacement planting.

Through classroom discussion, demonstrations, and a walk through the Urban Forest Nursery fields, we will cover tree nursery practices, species selection, root ball preparation, planting practices, and early structural pruning. The nursery walk will include a look at the progression of pruning and structural training for street tree specimens over a 3 to 5-year span.

Soil! What it is and How it Works for Trees

It’s ALL about soil! Most people only have a vague idea of what soil is and how it works. You will learn more than you ever thought possible from this workshop about soil and how it works for trees. The reason you are alive, what nutrients are, how soil stores water and nutrients. The fundamentals that ALL humans on the planet Earth should know! Join OSU instructor of soil science James Cassidy as he invites you to learn more about how soil interacts with trees and impacts tree health.

Tree Disorder Diagnosis

Diagnosing plant health problems takes specialized knowledge and experience. In this workshop instructor Jim Flott will recommend diagnostic steps to follow in determining the problem. Case studies will be presented to demonstrate diagnosis process. This workshop provides a solid foundation for arborists of all skill and experience levels to aid in the diagnosis of tree disorders.

Tree Protection During Construction

Trees are commonly damaged during construction and successful preservation requires special consideration. This comprehensive workshop explores strategies for managing trees during construction through all phases of development. Learn about:

  • The value of preserving existing trees with development;
  • The importance of the arborist’s role throughout project planning, design and construction;
  • Identifying trees that are suitable for preservation;
  • The possible ways trees may be affected by construction;
  • Tree protection measures and monitoring;
  • The use of alternative construction techniques to provide for tree protection; and
  • Addressing tree damage, risk potential and remedial treatments.

Tree Risk Assessment Qualification Renewal

The ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification (TRAQ) program provides an opportunity for professionals in the arboriculture industry to expand their knowledge through education and training in the fundamentals of tree risk assessment. This qualification promotes the safety of people and property by providing a standardized and systematic process for assessing tree risk. The results of a tree risk assessment can provide tree owners and risk managers with the information to make informed decisions to enhance tree benefits, health, and longevity. The Tree Risk Assessment Renewal workshop is a one-day refresher, with five hours of instruction, and three hours of take the exam. Current TRAQ holders can complete the abbreviated course as early as four years into their qualification.

Why Trees Fail – The Physics of Windstorm Tree Failure

This workshop provides a solid foundation for arborists of all skill and experience levels to aid in assessing why trees fail in storm events and improves their ability to assess risk.

There has been a proliferation of tree anchorage and tree biomechanics research in the last decade. Understanding why trees fail involves application of this recent research in order to discard outdated beliefs, generalizations, anecdotes, and industry myths and misinformation. Tree, root, and crown attributes, loads, weather, and tree biomechanics will be discussed in relation to wind storms.

The workshop and discussion will review, synthesize and integrate several research findings to try to understand how and why some trees fail, some do not, and some break along the trunk, while others uproot.