Workshop Descriptions

Advanced Tree Risk Assessment

Tree risk assessment is an area of urban forest management that has evolved rapidly in the past decade. We have moved from simple hazard tree assessment concepts into a more sophisticated understanding of risk in general. With the introduction of the ISA’s Best Management Practices document for Tree Risk Assessment, and the Tree Risk Assessment Qualification (TRAQ), several new approaches and guidelines have been introduced. Within the field of tree risk assessment there are many techniques and concepts to master; from basic principles through to sophisticated diagnostic techniques.

This course will focus on Level Three advanced tree risk assessment, but will also link this to Levels One and Two to show when Level Three may be required, and how to relate it to other work.

This course will be delivered by Dr. Julian Dunster, the designer of the original Certified Tree Risk Assessor credential (TRACE) and author of the new ISA Tree Risk Assessment manual for the TRAQ course. The course will be of interest to anyone practicing tree risk assessment, and especially arborists already holding the Tree Risk Assessment Qualification.

Basics of Tree Biomechanics

This workshop will cover the basics of tree biomechanics, and how these principles can be used to guide pruning goals, tree risk assessment, and tree healthcare.

How have trees adapted to survive wind storms? When is a decayed tree no longer safe? How can we prune trees to increase strength through structure? If you have ever found yourself asking any of these questions, then there is an answer to be found in tree biomechanics. Tree biomechanics is the study of tree biology using engineering principles to better understand how trees have adapted to withstand various forces imposed upon them.

This workshop will cover the basics of tree biomechanics and show how to use the current findings in the field to better understand tree stability and wood strength. The goal of this workshop is to increase your knowledge of tree structure, and show how to use research findings to shape your arboricultural practices. The instructor will share how studies in the field are helping us learn more about tree behavior and predicting tree failure.

The workshop will include lectures plus interactive examples to learn how trees work. Workshop participants will examine tree samples to see and feel firsthand how taper, mass damping, and sway influence tree behavior.

Common Fungi Affecting PNW Trees and Implications for Tree Risk Assessment

This course will be of use to anyone interested in tree diseases, and particularly anyone conducting risk assessment of trees with disease.

Arborists and foresters conducting tree risk assessments need to:

  1. Know what to look for, and
  2. Know what they are looking at.

Fungi affecting trees show considerable variability in form and their ability to cause decay. Part of that variability is driven by the species of tree and fungus, the age and vigor of the tree, the extent of the fungal attack and associated decay, and the ability of the tree to compartmentalize the invading pathogens. Understanding the CODIT process is integral to understanding where decay may be within the tree. Minimizing bark scaring from park or forest management activities reduces the creation of fungal infection courts that threaten long-term tree health.

Effective Report Writing: Guidance for Arborists and Urban Foresters

Writing is a critical part of communication. If the reader cannot understand what you are telling them, how do you expect them to proceed?  In this class we will review how to write effectively. We will work on the writing styles needed to develop or respond to a request for proposal, as well as site memos, field reports, letter and formal reports with each one tailored to their intended use. The report themes will focus on risk assessment, construction sites, and site memos in general.

Introduction to Tree Climbing

Introduction to Tree Climbing is a 2-day hands-on workshop designed for tree care professionals who want to learn or refresh the basic fundamentals, practice and safety protocols of tree access and climbing for arboricultural work. This course will teach those new to climbing the basic skills to be safe, efficient and productive out in the field. If students have personal climbing equipment they are encouraged to bring their gear to learn how to properly inspect the life support components. Emphasis on ANSI Z133 safety standards compliance will be an ongoing theme throughout the 2 day workshop to drive home the importance of safety.

ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification

The ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification (TRAQ) program provides an opportunity for professionals in the arboriculture industry to expand their knowledge through education and training in the fundamentals of tree risk assessment. This qualification promotes the safety of people and property by providing a standardized and systematic process for assessing tree risk. The results of a tree risk assessment can provide tree owners and risk managers with the information to make informed decisions to enhance tree benefits, health, and longevity.

ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification Renewal

The ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification (TRAQ) program provides an opportunity for professionals in the arboriculture industry to expand their knowledge through education and training in the fundamentals of tree risk assessment. This qualification promotes the safety of people and property by providing a standardized and systematic process for assessing tree risk. The results of a tree risk assessment can provide tree owners and risk managers with the information to make informed decisions to enhance tree benefits, health, and longevity. The Tree Risk Assessment Renewal workshop is a one-day refresher, with five hours of instruction, and three hours of take the exam. Current TRAQ holders can complete the abbreviated course as early as four years into their qualification.

Oregon Forest Pest Detector Training: Help Combat the Tree Killers

Become part of Oregon’s frontline in the defense against invasive forest insect pests. In this workshop you will learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle, two of Oregon’s least wanted forest threats. You will learn about current early detection and rapid response efforts and how to report a suspected pest so that it is handled quickly. These are good skills to have in the arborist’s toolbox and also a boost to keeping Oregon’s forests healthy. Learn about the following:

Rising Above the Noise: Increasing Your Personal and Professional Impact and Influence

As arborists and urban foresters, we face many challenges and opportunities to help people understand and connect with the important role trees play in our daily lives. Yet so many people still take trees for granted. This presentation will help attendees with the “non-tree” aspects of moving their arboriculture and urban forestry efforts to the next level through three key contexts:

  • Personal effectiveness
  • Organizational growth
  • Collaborative action

The key messages are that we need to continuously learn and hone our “soft-skills” and strategic thinking abilities, we need to grow our organizations and companies to be both efficient and nimble, and we need to work collaboratively with each other to increase our influence and ability to rise above the noise that clamors for people’s attention.

Structural Support Systems – Cabling and Bracing

What is structural support and how does it affect tree health and longevity? The Structural Support Systems Workshop will be a 2 day workshop that is lecture based and hands-on. This workshop will cover the ANSI A300 Part 3 Supplemental Support Systems standards that are applied to the installation and maintenance of tree support systems, including cabling, bracing and guying. Various cabling approaches with be discussed such as bracing for split trees, through rods, and outside the box support systems. Static versus dynamic cabling systems will be compared, looking at where, when and why to install each system. Looking at structure support of weakened unions, wind dampening, and supporting abnormal growth structure, we will take a comprehensive approach at the purpose of cabling a tree and which system would likely be most successful. Cabling system construction and installation practices will be discussed to focus on the approach to find the most effective system to fit the tree.